How to paint on glass with milk paint

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

When customers visit my shop they are always impressed with the painted mason jars I have on display. When I tell them how simple it is to use milk paint on glass, they are thrilled! 

I wanted to paint some small projects to show the Miss Mustard Seed's European colours and decided to paint these wine glasses. I have painted quite a few mason jars and I seriously needed a break! 

The wine glasses are for display purposes only and I wouldn't drink out of them. They have been waxed and I don't think they would hold up well to frequent washing in sudsy water. But, they are still adorable and would be cute with a tealight candle in them. Oh no! I just thought of this. How cute would a few flowers be in them? Real cute! But, I am already typing up this blog post and the chances of me going to my garden, cutting flowers and then taking more pictures is about zero. Sorry! But, how charming would that be for a wedding? I did not paint or wax the inside of the wine glasses, so putting water in them would be fine. 

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

Before I forget, I wanted to mention that if you want to paint on metal, you can use this same technique.

On with the tutorial ... first, make sure your glass is clean.

To ensure your paint adheres well to glass, it is important to add Bonding Agent to your paint. Mix your paint powder and water first and once it is well mixed, then you add the Bonding Agent. If you try to mix the paint powder, water and bonding agent all at once, you will end up with a clumpy mess.

I mixed about 2 tablespoons paint powder with 2 tablespoons of water. I then added about 4 tablespoons of bonding agent. When I paint on glass or metal I always add an equal part of Bonding Agent to the mixed paint.

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

This is what happens when you do not use Bonding Agent. The paint did not stick in areas and I can easily scrap off the paint with my fingernail. Perhaps this is the look you are going for though. That is okay too!

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

I painted the glasses with two coats of paint. Once the paint was dry I sanded the wine glasses with 220 grit sandpaper. Lately I have  been using round discs of sandpaper that are meant to go on an orbital sander and I love them. For smaller projects I cut a small piece and it is way easier to hold.

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

And this picture is me sanding! I then wiped off the dust with a lint free rag. 

I must say, all these "hand shots" are sorta creepy! I had to set my camera on a tripod, set the timer and then run over and do what I had to take a photo of. It was quite time consuming and challenging. So, creepy or not, this is my tutorial. Next time I think I will get someone to help me!

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

I then put on one coat of Miss Mustard Seed's Furniture Wax using a waxing brush.

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

I waited about five minutes and then buffed the wax with a lint free rag. 

Speaking of lint free rags, our local Salvation Army Thrift Store in Thunder Bay sells a garbage bag full of rags for $10. There are two choices: a bag of t-shirts or a bag of towels and face clothes. The t-shirt bag is great because they are lint free and the towels are great to wipe your messy painting hands with. Super good deal! You have to ask the staff for the bags because they keep them in a back room. Maybe your local Sally Ann sells them too!

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

Done! The colours are (left to right): Schloss, Marzipan, Arabesque, Layla's Mint, Mora and Bergere.

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

I did not distress the wine glasses, but I like to distress mason jars so the wording on them is more legible. Using a Miss Mustard Seed's Wax Puck makes distressing simple. This mason jar is painted in Miss Mustard Seed's French Enamel.

Painting on glass with milk paint tutorial - European Collection of Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

Before you paint the jars, you rub the wax puck over the raised letters and any other areas you want to have a distressed look. Then, paint as usual. When you sand the jars, the paint will come off easily in the areas where you applied the wax. 

I have another blog post that shows a bunch of mason jars painted in gorgeous colours: 

Homestead House Milk Paint fall colours

Products used for this project:

Miss Mustard Seed's Milk paint

1 1/2" paint brush

Miss Mustard Seed's Bonding Agent

220 grit sandpaper

Miss Mustard Seed's Furniture Wax

Waxing brush (medium)

Miss Mustard Seed's Wax Puck (for distressing)

Posted on June 20, 2015 and filed under milk paint.