Layering colours with Fusion mineral paint

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Do you remember when you were a teenager and had sleepovers with your friends and stayed up all night long sharing secrets, playing truth or dare and giggling until your jaw hurt? I remember those days, but times have changed. Now I am more likely to stay up all night painting and slamming back coffee. Dark roast of course. 

The other night I actually painted and took photos until 7:00 a.m. True story. You see, I promised Jennylyn, the creator of Fusion mineral paint, that I would paint a piece of furniture for her and take photos for an ad they were doing. I am not sure why I said I could do it, as I was really crunched for time. Hence, my painting all night long. (I did it because Jennylyn rocks and is the sweetest gal you could ever meet!) 

Jennylyn wanted an image that was "soft, romantic and had a european feel to it". She wanted layers of paint in the colours algonquin, damask and champlain. She could envision a jelly cabinet painted up. 

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I did not have a jelly cabinet in my back 40, but I did have this little guy. The inserts of the cupboard doors had green and white checkered plastic stuff glued on. I believe it is called mack tack. I pulled off the mack tack, but most of the glue stayed. I left the glue and painted right over it for some texture. Texture is always a good thing on an old piece of furniture. 

I did not do any prep work to the cabinet. I just painted right over top of the existing paint.

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I wanted the cabinet to have a dark background showing through the paint so I painted on two coats of Fusion in chocolate. It is important to note that you should allow 12 hours drying time between coats for best adhesion. Did I? Heck no. I was on a deadline. This is one of those situations where I should say "do as I say, not as I do".

I love chocolate (bars and the paint colour)! Sometimes you can score a great piece of furniture but it has already been painted. So if you want to distress the piece and have the "wood" show through, chocolate will fool them every time! 

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Next I brushed on one coat of Fusion in algonquin. I painted quick like Speedy Gonzales and didn't go over any areas that the brush didn't cover with the first stroke because I wanted the "wood" to show through. I kept a slightly damp rag handy and in some areas I wiped off the paint where I thought natural distressing would occur from years of use. Fusion dries quickly, so you should wipe it off as you are painting and not wait until you have finished the entire piece. 

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I actually like the look of the cabinet with just the colour algonquin on top of the chocolate. You could stop here if this was the look you wanted.

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

For the next layer I dry brushed on using Fusion in damask. (A little more info on dry brushing later on). In all honesty, I was a little horrified. I had just ruined my cabinet! I thought to myself "trust Jennylyn's colour choices. She was born with a paintbrush in her hand".

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

And a close up shot of the chocolate, layered with algonquin and damask. Not my favourite combination at this point!

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Next I dry brushed on Fusion in champlain. It toned down the damask colour and I was loving it! Jennylyn sure knows her colour combinations!

Now I loved the cabinet, but the wood wall had to go! It was yelling rustic and I was going for romantic. Okay for a tutorial, but not for an ad.

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Remember I used the chocolate paint trick to make it look like wood? Well, there are also photography tricks that are simple to do. I knew a couple old doors would make a nice background and although they did fill the entire space, I was only taking partial shots of the cabinet.

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Now I was getting the right feel for the photos. Jennylyn wanted me to stage the photos with just paint. That worked for me! I still have tons to learn when it comes to furniture staging and I struggle with it every time. All my favorite bloggers make it look so easy, but it is not something that comes naturally to me. 

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)
Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)
Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Here's a close up shot of the cabinet door. Can you see all the texture from the glue? Love it!

Fusion makes a products called Fusion™ Sand Stone Texture that you can use to create this textured look. Here is their description of it:

"Fusion™ Sand Stone Texture medium is an acrylic based soft plaster type medium with a fine sand finish. It is perfect if you are trying to achieve an old textured finish. It can be brushed, rolled or pulled through a stencil for a dimensional effect. It can be tinted using Fusion™ paints or tints. It can also be used to give the effect of old paint build up by sponging it on in areas and then painting over it."

I guess I should do a tutorial on using sand stone texture. I'll add it to my list!

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I had to take a shot of the gorgeous colours. From the top: algonquin, damask and champlain.

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Here's a quick recap so you don't have to scroll back up to see the layering of colours.

Fusion mineral paint tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

If you have never dry brushed before here are some tips:

Dip your brush into the paint and put a little (and I mean a wee little) bit of paint on the tip of your brush. Then remove some of the paint. I use a scrap cardboard and swipe my brush back and forth on it until there is almost no paint left on the brush. The area below my paintbrush in the photo is how I want my paint to look going on the furniture. You can also use a rag to remove some of the paint, but I find if I use cardboard I can see how much paint is still on the brush before I apply it to the furniture.

Now you will lightly paint the furniture. Make sure to apply very little pressure with your brush. You want to stroke back and forth quickly. It is more of a "slapping motion" than a regular painting motion. 

If you have applied too much paint to an area you can use a rag or a sponge to remove some of the paint. When you are drybrushing, the paint dries very quickly and you must remove it right away. If you don't, you have two choices. You can sand off some of the paint or you can touch up with one of the other paint colours you have used. Personally, I am a touch up kinda gal. 

The great thing about painting in layers is that you can just keep working it until you get the look you want.

If you want to learn more about Fusion Mineral Paint, you can take a peek at more of my Fusion blog posts!

Posted on January 21, 2015 and filed under Fusion mineral paint.