Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I like to take old things and repurpose them because I believe even the imperfect things deserve a second chance. I found this old bucket in the basement of the old general store that I bought. I would imagine it was used to wash many floors over the years.

I needed a container to put my little Christmas tree in and thought this bucket would be perfect, but I wanted to pretty it up a little bit. 

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I wiped off the cobwebs on the bucket but didn't even bother to wash it, hence the dirt still on it. 

I mixed up some Miss Mustard Seed's milk paint in tricycle and used an old brass stencil to paint on the letter P. I then used painting tape to make a stripe. I only used one coat of paint and did a fairly quick, imperfect paint job because I wanted the paint to look as old as the bucket. I only put on one coat of paint.

Normally I would add MMS bonding agent to the paint when painting on metal to ensure that it adhered well, but quite frankly if the paint did not stick in areas, I was okay with that. Surprisingly, the paint adhered very well.

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Once the paint was dry, I gave it a quick sanding using 220 grit sandpaper. 

To protect the paint I applied MMS hemp oil with a paint and wax brush. I prefer to work with a brush, but a rag also works fine. You can see that the right side of the bucket has hemp oil on it and the left side does not.

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Applying the hemp oil made the red more vibrant and it also made the dirt way more obvious. I prefer to call the dirt "patina". Works for me!

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I let the bucket sit overnight and then I wiped off the excess hemp oil with a rag. I only used one coat of hemp oil but you can apply more coats for additional sheen and protection.

When I first applied the hemp oil it was very shiny. Once I wiped off the excess it becomes less shiny. By the following day the hemp oil was dry and had a beautiful sheen to it. 

Metal does not absorb hemp oil like wood does, so it your metal still feels oily to the touch after a day or two, no worries, just wipe off the excess again. 

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

Hemp oil has quickly become one of my favorite things. It is all natural and does not contain any nasty solvents. I don't notice an odour, although some people say it has a slight odour to it.

Hemp oil is even food friendly, so you can even refresh your wood salad bowls, cutting boards or butcher block with it. It does a wonderful job reviving old wood.

Using Miss Mustard Seed's hemp oil on metal tutorial - via My Painted Door (.com)

I know we are in the middle of winter, but as I was typing up this blog post I couldn't stop thinking about all of the old galvanized containers and other metal things that I have in my garden that I am going to give some milk paint and hemp oil love to in the spring! For outdoor use you should apply 3 - 4 coats of hemp oil on your projects for additional protection from the elements. You can also use MMS tung oil for your outdoor projects.

Gardening was my first love and combining it with my passion for painting is a wonderful thing. I have a couple more old bikes kicking around my garden that I can't wait to paint in the spring. One bike will definitely be pink! The MMS European collection that is coming out in early 2015 has a wonderful pink or I could easily mix the colour tricycle and one of the whites for my own custom pink.

Posted on December 17, 2014 and filed under milk paint.